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Orlando Patterson explains why America can’t escape its racist roots

Orlando Patterson explains why America can’t escape its racist roots

June 4, 2020

The killing of George Floyd, who died after a white Minneapolis police officer kneeled into his neck for nearly nine minutes during an arrest, has spurred a wave of rage, anguish, and protests across the country. To better understand what is happening and what the future may hold, the Gazette talked with Orlando Patterson, the John Cowles Professor of Sociology. A scholar of slavery and issues of race, Patterson talked about the legacy of white supremacist ideology, racism in policing, and the ongoing, widespread discrimination and...

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‘Gathering Historias’ reveals deep-rooted connections to nature

‘Gathering Historias’ reveals deep-rooted connections to nature

June 4, 2020

Steven Salido Fisher is doing sacred work simply by listening to people as they share the stories in their hearts.

The Harvard Divinity School (HDS) student is building on a mission to give people in the local Hispanic community an elevated voice about the natural environment. His project, “Gathering Historias” is documenting, in their...

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Grad advocates for people with disabilities and their families

Grad advocates for people with disabilities and their families

June 4, 2020

This is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.

A lot of what Nathan Grant did while at Harvard — and plans to do now — circles back to his twin brother, Nik.

At 3 years old, Nik was diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder called Hunter syndrome, also known as MPS II. It is progressively debilitating, causing stunted growth, developmental disabilities, respiratory problems, and shortened life expectancy. Doctors...

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Study finds political bias skews perceptions of verifiable fact

Study finds political bias skews perceptions of verifiable fact

June 3, 2020

Politics has seeped into every corner of our lives. Even announcements once thought above rank partisanship, such as states letting voters mail their ballots this fall and the death toll from the COVID-19 pandemic, now ignite accusations of political bias. Research by Harvard economists finds that politics don’t just influence people’s attitudes about economic issues and policies, it shapes their perceptions of verifiable reality.

Studies of Republicans and Democrats, as well as Trump voters and non-Trump voters, found that people with...

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Fighting for disabled workers rights amid pandemic

Fighting for disabled workers rights amid pandemic

June 3, 2020

This is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.

Ariella Barker, M.C./M.P.A. ’20, has spent her life taking on the workplace challenges faced by people with disabilities.

As the graduate returns to her job as an attorney for the city of New York, litigating employment discrimination and labor law cases, the challenges have become all the more urgent — and universal — amid the COVD-19 pandemic. Returning to...

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Lawrence D. Bobo examines police killings of black men

Lawrence D. Bobo examines police killings of black men

June 2, 2020

Protesters once again have taken to the nation’s streets to voice their anger over another killing of a black man by police officers. The reaction now seems familiar, if higher in heat and broader in scale. This time it was over George Floyd, who suffocated after a white Minneapolis police officer jammed his knee into Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes while three other officers either held him down or looked on. Floyd is the latest link in a long chain of deaths and injuries involving police:  Rodney King, Malice Wayne Green, Abner Louima, Amadou Diallo, Eric Garner,...

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Four Native Americans make history at the GSD

Four Native Americans make history at the GSD

June 1, 2020

For the first time in its history, Harvard Graduate School of Design (HGSD) has four Native American students enrolled.

Design and architecture schools across the country have historically had few Native students, with no more than a handful at a particular school at any given time. And out of over 90,000 working architects in this country, only a small percentage are Native American, notes GSD student Elsa Hoover. (A 2015 American Institute of Architects diversity report listed American Indian or Alaska native at 1 percent, based on survey responses.)

Hoover, Zoë Toledo, Heidi...

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Martin Baron’s message to Class of 2020: Facts and truth matter

May 28, 2020

Washington Post executive editor Martin Baron offered a ringing defense of facts and the truth on Thursday, telling Harvard seniors who tuned in to an online graduation program for the Class of 2020 that the current coronavirus pandemic has not only underscored the value of accurate, authoritative information but has shown that lies and misinformation...

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Alberto Alesina, a pioneer of modern political economy, dies at 63

May 27, 2020

Alberto Alesina, one of the world’s most influential economists who applied economic analysis to thorny social and political problems and helped found the field of modern political economy, died Saturday at age 63 of an apparent heart attack while hiking with his wife, Susan. He taught at Harvard for more than three decades.

Alesina, Ph.D. ’86, was the Nathaniel Ropes Professor of Political Economy and a member of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Alesina had directed the bureau’s Political Economic Program since its creation in 2006. According to...

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